Famous, Rich and Jobless Review: The Benefits Of Celebrity

March 9, 2010 by  
Filed under - Home, Reviews

FAMOUS, RICH AND JOBLESS: Tuesday 9th March, BBC1, 9pm ALERT ME

Poor celebrities. The things they have to do to get their mugs on telly these days.

Guest appearances on quiz shows and letting Loyd Grossman nose around your house just isn’t enough anymore. If you want to boost your public profile you’re going to have to make more effort than that – you might even have to interact with commoners.

Famous, Rich and Homeless sees four well-off celebs give up their plush country piles for a week to live in cheap accommodation, get by on benefits and try and get a job.

Emma-Parker Bowles, rather generously introduced as ‘a model’, Diarmuid Gavin, telly gardener, Meg Matthews, Noel Gallagher’s ex-wife – now a ‘interior designer’ apparently, and Archie Mitchell, sorry, Larry Lamb are each given a bin-bag of cheap clothes and a few quid on which to survive.

They are shipped off to various unemployment hot-spots across the country where they will live and try their best to earn a crust.

After gasping in horror at their new homes (which don’t look that unlike my flat) they hit the streets pleading with anyone and everyone to ‘gis us a job’. All except Larry, who spends an hour talking to a bloke in a charity shop about how hard it is to find work in Hartlepool and that at 62 he might as well give up. Which he does.

The others take to the challenge with a bit more enthusiasm, Emma Parker-Bowles, the former alcoholic niece of Camilla, faces her demons after securing shifts in a pub. Meg Matthews chatty persona works to her advantage and Diarmuid Gavin does well with sheer persistence.

The show won’t tell you much about the unemployment situation, which we all know is bad, but does reveal a lot about the celebrities. Those you predict to flop manage to fly, while Larry shows he’s not far removed from his Eastenders character.

Stephen Smith says:

It was interesting to see how the ‘celebs’ managed being in the situation of ‘unemployed’
Having been made redundant last March,In have applied for loads of jobs,without success,although being 56 this year I’m not all that supprised!
Larry hit ‘the nail on the head’ when he stated ‘what’s the point of a 62-year old giving out cv’s?’.I could see where he was going.
To me it still seems that being over 55 is a problem and there are still too many folks out there chasing too few jobs.
One can only hope that things may get better!