Death In Venice Review: Mama Miaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!

November 6, 2009 by  
Filed under - Home, Reviews

3DEATH IN VENICE: Saturday 7th November, LIVING, 9pm ALERT ME

When Paul O’Grady’s agent called him about a TV show in Venice, he probably thought the job would involve a couple of hours on the Rialto Bridge followed by a weekend of bolognese and bellinis.

But going on holiday with Yvette Fielding is far less relaxing than it used to be.

Suffice to say, there wasn’t a gondola in sight when the nation’s favourite ghost hunter and her new accomplice set off to investigate a Venetian island, thought by many experts to be “the most haunted place on the planet?.

This piece of trivia came as a bit of a shock to us – surely there can be few places as phantom-ridden as the village of Midsomer.

But we digress…

With his large suitcase of spare underwear at the ready, Paul O’Grady was ready to make contact with spirits from the other side; unfortunately he had to go underground to do it.

Anyone who has seen The Last Crusade will know that poking around underneath the streets of Venice not only leads to very wet feet but can seriously risk your health.

Yet to his credit, O’Grady took it all in his stride manfully and unlike the OTB team, he even managed to keep his cool when some child apparitions start lobbing rocks about.

But hang on a minute we hear you cry. Surely Venice is the capital of love? What on earth is the lovably chirpy Yvette Fielding doing in some damp Italian cellar when she could be checking out home-grown phantoms back in Britain?

It turns out that as haunted places go, there are few as cursed as Poveglia, the site where 160,000 plague victims – and (if locals are to be believed) a large number of vampires – died during the middle ages.

This programme will be guzzled by Fielding’s large cult fanbase and some of the spiritual activity caught on camera is genuinely remarkable.

We just don’t understand how a bunch of Italian peasants from the 1300s managed to understand Paul O’Grady.

Mysterious…

Sean Marland